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A bit about starfish and doing church

There’s great anticipation among many of those in the organic and house church movements for the release of Wolfgang Simson’s newest upcoming book. Me, too. Houses that Change the World was a significant book for me (it tops my best books read in 2006 list) and I’m looking forward to seeing what Simson’s thinking now.

It looks like the book is slated for release next month. Andrew Jones (aka Tall Skinny Kiwi, who reports he’s actually not that tall, heh) graciously let us know back in November that the anticipated release that month was moved to December; Simson’s December newsletter reports it’s now slated for January, due to requests for a bit more time from those giving feedback to Simson about the book.

According to Simson, the book (with an original working title of Prophetic Intelligence for Apostolic Architecture) is now titled simply The Starfish Manifesto. A hint from the book’s title as to its content? Writes Simson in his newsletter in relation to another, unrelated book using the same image, “For us, the concept of a starfish is a symbol for God’s amazing power of multiplication at every level. It is a concept of organic multiplication and flat-structured, viral movements.”

Simson and company have also put up a basic website--thestarfishproject.net--so keep checking it. (The site is in German, but if you don't speak/read German like me, you can use BabelFish to translate.) The book will be released as an E-book for free—but, hints Simson, “it will cost you… (more on that is explained in the vision - mission part of the book).”

Keep your feelers out for this one.

(Image: Starfish by Automania at flickr; some rights reserved)

Comments

graham old said…
I thought the first book was absolutely appalling. I think that it's poor scholarship actually did a disservice to those of us exploring organic church or lamenting the Constantinian shift.

Not sure I'll bother with this one.
Carmen Andres said…
hey, graham -- good to hear from you again! i'm curious about the poor scholarship angle. if you return, please feel free to expand on that. much appreciated!